Mia Pinheiro

 

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Mia Pinheiro is a multi-disciplinary artist who is from the New Bedford MA/Burlington, VT and currently lives in Mexico City. In June 2018 she exhibited mYto, a myth-making playground during her residency at LLORAR CDMX in Mexico City and in March 2018, she created the immersive fantasy Feast of Fictions while in residency at The Lab Program at Pandeo DF in Mexico City. She completed an intensive study with the choreographer Deborah Hay and was a cast member of the Royal Frog Ballet Surrealist Cabaret Autumn 2017 after teaching the intensive summer course The Body Ensouled: Intimacy of Place and Insight of Motion with Temenos VT. She has created a variety of collaborative movement pieces with unique location including the Winooski River, New City Gallerie, The Light Club Lamp Shop, The Hive, The Attic, Museu Contemporaneo Arte Oaxaca and Bosque Ciudad de Mexico. She has received a degree in contemporary dance and movement studies through the University of Vermont and has with studied with wide variety of talented choreographers including Erika Senft-Miller, Claire Byrne and Hannah Dennison. She is an alumni of Temenos Vermont's Course Creative Concept Development: Art as Alchemy. She has supplemented her studies through the completion of many workshops: 'Siente' at CASA San Augustin Etla in Oaxaca, MX by Laura Rios and Linda Austin, 'Figure/Ground' at Shelburne Farms Breeding Barn by Hannah Dennison, 'Taller Danza Africana' at AfrOaxaquena, MX by Karim Keita and 'MELT' at Movement Research, NY by Vicky Schick. She has often found herself as a assistant stage director, choreographer or roving performance artist. 

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1.07 You Are Here

"Thinking of this as a translation, a communication down a line, passing the same information through alternate devices—I received sound and transferred it into a moving map through film, attempting to conjure the message. The images it created, the bits of story I felt through the sounds, its tragedy and its not-tragedy. I listened repeatedly and wondered how to accomplish a true translation. I wrote and wrote and wrote and then filed through collections of my sound and film and thought of instructions to guide the viewer through the same experiential undulations as … the music instill[ed]. It was an internal combat to stick with a translation, a continual process of coming back to the former artist’s work to make sure my own language was properly conveying the original intention of the artist, instead of merely using the music as a jumping off point for a separate work. It is not a separate work, it is the same thing."

—Mia Pinheiro